List of airlines that allow portable oxygen

aeroplane

Always check before booking your flight as details and policies may change. These airlines have allowed portable oxygen concentrators you can reach out to their websites for further information and to confirm their conditions.

Aegean Airlines
Aer Lingus
Air Canada
Air China
Air France
Air Iceland
Air New Zealand
Air Malta
Air Tahiti Nui
Airtran Airways
Alaska Airlines
American Airlines
Alitalia
All Nippon Airways
Allegiant Air
American Airlines
Avianca Airlines
British Airways
China Southern Airlines
Continental Airlines
Delta
EasyJet
Emirates
Frontier
Hawaiian Airlines
Iberia
Icelandair
Japanese Airlines
Jet Blue
KLM
Lufthansa
Mango
Qantas
Ryanair
Singapore Airlines
South African Airways
Southwest
Sun Country
Swiss Air Lines
Turkish Airlines
United Airlines
US Airways
Virgin Atlantic
Virgin Australia
WestJet Airlines

Also refer to our website here for countries we can deliver oxygen to once at your destination.

What oxygen therapy information do you need when planning a trip?

The best thing to do is to contact your GP or Doctor or specialist consultant to obtain the below information before contacting the team to plan and delivery what you will need on your next trip.

  • Will you require oxygen for the whole journey or just for a certain amount of time
  • Maximum flow rate
  • If you require battery power on the plane then please do contact your airline to see if a seat is available with access to a power socket
  • Always pack spare adapters
  • If you will be using your portable oxygen concentrator during the flight, you may not sit in an emergency exit row or in a seat that restricts other passengers’ access to an emergency exit.

How to plan your holiday with oxygen

How can I make travelling easier?

  • Make all travel plans in advance
  • Prepare for typical problems
  • Plan rest stops, snack breaks, stretches and short walks
  • Plan to travel at cooler times of the day or year, so less air conditioning is needed
  • Follow your home routine as much as possible
  • When making travel reservations (e.g. bus, airline, tours), be sure to notify the staff of your oxygen use, so they can accommodate your needs
  • Also make sure you look up any additional requirements for where you are travelling such as covid measures, paperwork or passenger forms in advance to save you trouble on route

For further information, quotes and advice when travelling abroad with medical oxygen contact our team at OxygenWorldwide on info@oxygenworldwide.com

Taken from one of our popular posts on tip for planning.

3 tips for you and your oxygen

clouds and blue sky
  1. Always plan ahead; whether you are going away for a short day trip or a long vacation. Always plan your oxygen needs in advance to allow time for suitable arrangements.
  2. Speak with others in forums or through specialists teams – these will give you good guides, tips and advice on the best services, hotels, at home tips with your medical oxygen.
  3. Don’t let it stop you. Always stay as active as you can at home and out and about. Portable medical oxygen allows patients to have a normal life and its so important for your mental wellbeing to see friends and enjoy your hobbies.

If you are travelling with oxygen or planning to at some point; feel free to see our range of resources and links over at OxygenWorldwide and speak to our specialist team for enquiries and advice. They have over 20 years experience of travel with oxygen across many countries.

3 places to go this February

With February being the month surrounded by love, it is also the perfect time of year to explore, venture or go somewhere new. Travel is getting easier now and as everyone becomes a bit more confident the appetite for international travel is increasing. A short trip away can bring so many things such as discovery, break from the same surroundings or the change to finally visit friends and family. Travel can also help to lift moods and spirits especially as many who have been vulnerable have been inside for a long time or even scared to venture out let alone to another country.

Our top 3 favourites for February are:

  1. Paris – well it is the month of love!
  2. Venice – romantic city and great food!
  3. Maldives – being on an island may just be what you need to be with nature

The Stanley Johnson loophole and what this means for you…

homes in spain

You may have heard this in the UK press recently and wondering what this means? This loophole has been discovered for UK residents who own second homes. Many UK residents have holiday homes or second homes across Europe such as Spain, France and Italy. Lots of UK residents who have enjoyed their time split between being close to loved ones in the UK and also enjoying an extended holiday or summer months in warmer climates over the years.

The last 12 months has meant many have not been able to enjoy this as flights or travel was not permitted. Now the UK prepares to ease lockdown with its roadmap planned out there is a loophole for all those second home owners, but what is it?

All UK residents can travel to their second home if the reason is to prepare it for sale or rental reasons. This will come into force this week on step 1 of the latest roadmap allowing certain reasons to travel.

You may be wondering why it is called the ‘Stanley Johnson Loophole’ and it is connected to Boris Johnson’s father who travelled to his Greek villa to make it ‘COVID-proof’ which breached the guidelines at the time in summer 2020.

Below is what has been published that is an appropriate reason to travel to your second home:

– Visiting an estate agent
– Visiting a show home
– Viewing a property or several
– Preparing to move into a property
– If you need to travel for study
– If you are participating in an elite sport event

Currently travel from the UK carries a fine if rules are broken and although summer holidays for many now seems to not include getting on a plane to another country; will this loophole if still allowed mean for some they will be able to hop on a plane and get to their second home to prepare, buy or sell a property?





Top destinations for amazing Autumn Getaways

Autumn brings colour, seasons and change from the beach-filled tourism feel. After this summer seemed to come and go so fast and many of us not opting to go away, now is the perfect time to getaway before the end of the year. There is so much to explore, see and do even when travelling with medical oxygen.

Here is our top 10 European City Breaks:

  1. Prague
  2. Budapest
  3. Barcelona
  4. Vienna
  5. Malta
  6. Portugal
  7. Paris
  8. Berlin
  9. Copenhagen
  10. Dublin

Face masks & coverings – on or off?

Face coverings are becoming part of the everyday outfit now for most European citizens. Many have been advised to wear these face coverings to protect yourself and others. The UK has just announced that they must too wear a face covering when go into a shop or supermarket or they will be fined. There are several arguments for and against’on or off’,
what do you think?

Here are a few of the outlined arguments against:

  • Wearing a mask may inhibit breathing for those who already have respiratory problems
  • Dirty masks (as people may not wash them) can help spread more germs
  • It makes people feel invincible and therefore defeats the object


Here are a few of the outlined arguments for:

  • Protect yourself and others from catching anything infectious
  • Duty of care to health workers to keep safe at all times
  • China has already had wearing masks as a norm – even stylish that now it is selfish to not wear a mask especially if you feel ill, plus protects people from pollution

Let us know your opinion in the comments…

YES – You find it MORE SAFE to travel now nearly everybody has to wear a face mask or covering
NO – Although other people wear face masks or coverings, you may feel this puts you off and won’t travel as it does NOT make you feel safer than before.

I need oxygen for my holiday…

oxygen for holiday

You can still travel the world, even when you need medical oxygen too. If you need oxygen for your holiday here are some popular questions you may be wondering:

  1. Can you travel abroad with oxygen? If you need oxygen on your holiday, you will need to arrange oxygen at your destination before you travel. Contact OxygenWorldwide for quotes.
  2. Can I take oxygen on a plane? The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) does not allow travellers to carry their own oxygen aboard  aircraft. You are advised that a Department of Transportation approved battery-powered portable oxygen concentrator is ok to use.
  3. How much is a portable oxygen concentrator? Buying your own is expensive but to use whilst on holiday prices do vary but using experienced OyxgenWorlwide can obtain competitive quotes and have the knowledge of many locations across the globe.
  4. How do you travel abroad with oxygen? Contact the airline you are travelling with first, make sure you have your prescription and also any doctors notes to take with you. Prepare and plan your requirements needed for the duration of the trip. Use OxygenWorldwide as the 24 hours service whilst on your trip allows for that extra care needed when abroad and possibly not your native language.

How Do Different Devices Provide My Oxygen?

Oxygen therapy is administered in a variety of ways depending upon the circumstance, the patient’s requirements and the devices used. It is required in order to provide additional oxygen to the patient and to increase the level of oxygen in the body needed by your body to function.
In most cases the oxygen first passes through a pressure regulator which controls the oxygen pressure as it passes from an oxygen cylinder to the device which is at a lower pressure. Once the oxygen is at this lower pressure, the flow of the oxygen can be controlled by a flow-meter and is measured in litres of oxygen per minute (lpm). The usual flow rate for most devices is between 0 and 15 lpm but can be as high as 25 lpm in some units. Many flow-meters are based on a ‘Thorpe tube’ design which can be set to ‘flush’ which is useful in an emergency situation.
In room air the content of oxygen is only 21%, which although is adequate for healthy individuals, needs to be increased to help those with certain diseases or medical conditions in order to increase the oxygen that manages to get through to their blood stream. Usually increasing the oxygen to 30-35% is enough to make a significant difference and this can be achieved using a nasal cannula, a thin tube with an individual tube for each nostril. This can provide the oxygen at a low flow rate (0.25 to 6 lpm) to achieve an oxygen level of 24-40%.
To achieve higher oxygen concentrations various face masks can be used including a simple face mask, which can deliver oxygen at 5-15 lpm to achieve 28-50% oxygen levels. The Venturi mask can provide oxygen up to 40% and a partial re-breathing mask, which includes a reservoir bag attached to it can provide oxygen at between 40% and 70% concentration.
For patients requiring 100% oxygen the most common device is the non-breather or reservoir mask. This is similar to the re-breathing mask but has a number of valves to stop air that has been exhaled from the lungs from returning to the bag. At a flow rate of 10 lpm up to 80% oxygen levels can be achieved.
For patients requiring the therapy on a constant long-term basis, the oxygen can be warmed and humidified before administration through the nasal cannula to prevent irritation and dryness.
If a patient cannot breathe independently then positive pressure may be needed to force air into the lungs, which is provided by complex artificial respirator machines such as ventilators or a continuous positive airway pressure machine.
References: http://www.news-medical.net and http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/home-oxygen