Going on holiday with a respiratory condition

Holiday tips
• Plan in advance: if you leave things to the last minute, you could forget something crucial. Think about how far you can walk, how many stairs you can manage, access to toilets and what transport you can use.
• Be realistic: places you liked in the past may not be suitable now. Pick something you and your carer can cope with physically.
• Shop around: different companies have different policies for people with lung conditions, so find the best deal for you. Many travel agents offer holidays for people with special requirements.
• Ask questions: travel firms are used to dealing with special requirements. They should be able to answer all of your queries and concerns.
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Holidays in the UK
How do I choose my accommodation?
Tourism for All’s National Accessible Accommodation Standard assesses all types of accommodation, including self-catering, for accessibility. It puts accommodation into four mobility categories:
• Category One – suitable for people able to climb a flight of stairs that have extra fittings to aid balance.
• Category Two – suitable for someone who needs a wheelchair some of the time but can manage a maximum of three steps.
• Category Three – suitable for people who depend on a wheelchair but who can transfer unaided to and from the wheelchair in a seated position.
• Category Four – suitable for a person who depends on the use of a wheelchair and needs help from a carer or a mechanical hoist to transfer to and from the wheelchair.
 
Holidays abroad
Many people with a lung condition think they can’t go abroad, but this isn’t true. As in the UK, packages differ, so shop around. Always check with your doctor or health care professional to make sure you are well enough to travel before deciding where to go, and always plan your arrangements in advance.
How do I get there?
Ferry
Many ferry companies have lifts, toilets and other facilities accessible to people with disabilities. They can offer priority loading and special parking to vehicles with disabled passengers.
Trains
Eurostar trains have been designed to cater for passengers with special needs. Some coaches have wheelchair access and allow oxygen containers on board. If you’re travelling further afield in Europe, contact the relevant European train company for its policy on travelling with oxygen.
Car
Make sure the car you are travelling in has been checked and/or serviced before you travel. Check whether your insurance company requires a green card – a document that makes it easier for vehicles to move freely across foreign borders. In the UK, Blue Badges allow drivers of passengers with severe mobility problems to park close to where they need to go. The UK has agreed informal parking arrangements with other European Union (EU) countries, so you may be able to use the Blue Badge abroad. You can find out more at www.direct.gov.uk/en/
disabledpeople/motoringandtransport/dg_4001061.
Holidaying abroad with oxygen
If you need oxygen for use throughout your holiday, you will need to make arrangements for the oxygen to be provided before you travel.
If you are travelling outside of Europe, you will need to contact an oxygen company that supplies the country you will be visiting.
Some travellers have found that hiring a portable oxygen concentrator (POC) is an alternative to arranging oxygen supplies for the majority of their holiday. However you may still need to consider arranging a back-up supply of oxygen for emergencies. If you are travelling by plane,
you should bear in mind that different airlines have different policies for using and carrying oxygen and medical devices such as POCs on board. Always check with the airline you are travelling with before you book.
 
 

Another client thank you!

downloWe have a house at Portugal and found your service browsing the internet. We would like to thank you for arranging the liquid oxygen plus the portable which my husband needed recently so that we still can enjoy our house together which we bought many years ago. Thank you OxygenWorldwide‘ Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson

New Year Resolutions

It’s time to set goals and new initiatives for yourself in the form of often-made, seldom-followed “New Year’s Resolutions”. We’ve developed some resolutions for people that use medical oxygen and who suffer from breathing conditions.
breath
 1.  Stop Smoking – This resolution is a no-brainer. A popular resolution every January for smokers, quitting smoking is the easiest way to prevent COPD, and it is the best way to slow the progression of COPD if you already have it. If you have an oxygen tank, then quitting smoking should be even more of a no-brainer, but in case you needed another reason to quit: it is incredibly dangerous to have smoke around a medical oxygen tank.
 2.  Go on Spontaneous Trips – One of the greatest gifts that a portable oxygen concentrator offers is the potential to do something unplanned. Enjoy that freedom to pick up and go somewhere. Sometimes the easy choice is to stay at home, but you will be happy that you decided to spend an afternoon out, and those closest to you will be happy as well. If you require medical oxygen and aren’t yet enjoying the freedom of a portable oxygen concentrator, then 2014 is the year to start.
 3.  Connect – Connect with a group or organization of interest. There is great comfort, support, and fun to be had in knowing that you are not the only one living with medical oxygen, a breathing condition, or both. Whether it’s attending an event or making a donation, you’ll feel better after you get involved.
 4.  Eat better, Exercise better, Live better -This is a very popular resolution, and there’s no reason why you shouldn’t make it one of yours and follow through with it. You might think that since you have your oxygen concentrator, the rest is out of your control. But when it comes to diet & exercise, there are a number of things that you can do to make things easier on yourself. Eating better will not only improve your overall health, but by eating certain foods and avoiding others, you can make breathing easier for yourself.
What are your personal New Year’s Resolutions? Share with us which of these 5 resolutions you’ve decided to adopt, and any others that you might have.
Find out more about travelling with a portable oxygen concentrator www.oxygenworldwide.com

EverGo Portable Oxygen Concentrator
For oxygen patients who love to travel and don’t want to be tied down by conventional oxygen therapy, portable oxygen concentrators is the answer making it ideal for oxygen patients traveling by plane, train, bus or car.
Oxygen patients never have to worry about storing oxygen tanks, waiting for home deliveries, or most importantly, running out of oxygen.
Traveling can seem daunting for people who require supplemental oxygen. But you don’t have to give up the ability to travel. With proper planning and guidance, you can go on a weekend getaway or a week-long vacation without worry.
The following are tips that you can use to plan your next trip.

  • Speak with your doctor to make sure it is safe for you to travel.
  • Obtain a current physician order (prescription) for your oxygen. Keep a copy with you at all times.
  • Decide where, how and when you will travel.
  • Contact your oxygen provider.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has approved many portable oxygen concentrator for use aboard commercial airline flights traveling. Because airline policies for traveling with an oxygen concentrator vary, patients need to check with their airlines before flying.

Managing Christmas Stress

w4r3Christmas can be a very stressful time for anyone – you want to buy presents for your friends and family, plan a trip, plan a family meal and a get-together, and handle the cold weather that you might be experiencing. All of this can be hard to handle for someone who is in full health, not to mention for someone who has a chronic lung condition, such as COPD, or for someone who needs to portable oxygen concentrator on a daily basis.

The key is to not out-do yourself. Buying presents and working yourself into a stressful situation isn’t worth taking a toll on your health. It’s important to keep in mind that your friends and loved ones would want you to stay healthy above all else this time of year.
Here are some ways you can manage your busy holiday season, so you aren’t trying to do too much at once and wearing, as well as ways to relax and just enjoy this special time of year.
Staying Calm and De-Stressing
Write down what you have to do on a calendar and space these things apart so that you have plenty of time between each event or activity. This gives you a time buffer, just in case something comes up. You won’t feel stressed out with a quickly approaching deadline.
Keep it simple with your finances. Shopping and thinking about your loved ones shouldn’t send you into a tizzy – it should be more enjoyable than stressful.
Keep your spending realistic and don’t stress out if you can’t afford to get your grandchildren or children that iPad that they want.
Have friends or family help you set up your Christmas decorations, which will save you some work and exhaustion, so you can enjoy the decorations, as well as the time spent with others. This kind of enjoyment is important to keep your stress levels down. After everything has been set up, sip some hot chocolate and watch Christmas films and enjoy the decorations. Scents are important when you are trying to relax. Natural pine scents, candles that smell like vanilla or freshly baked cookies that will help you relax.

We don’t take breathing for granted.

Travelling with oxygen
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Holiday and travel.
Even if you have a condition which requires oxygen therapy, you may wish to go on holiday either within the UK or abroad. We have put together some key considerations for you if you wish to go on holiday. We can help with many of the details and offer advice. Please give us as much notice of your holiday requirements, however
it is best to request as early as possible.
Going on holiday in the UK
Before you book
→ Contact your planned holiday destination to gain permission for oxygen equipment to be delivered and stored in the accommodation.
→ If you are travelling by public transport – contact the transport company and inform them you will be carrying oxygen.
Remember to advise:
1. Start and end date of your holiday
2. Full postal address and telephone number of the holiday destination.
Holidays outside the UK
(including the Channel Islands)
Before booking a holiday outside the UK it is advisable to discuss your plans with your doctor or
healthcare professional – especially if you are flying. During a flight, the high altitudes will cause the
oxygen concentration levels in the air in the cabin to fall. People without the need for supplementaryBefore you book your flight find out the following information:
→ What the airline’s policy is on oxygen. Taking oxygen on a plane can be easy and free, or
difficult and expensive. Some airlines will not allow oxygen on the plane at all, it depends on the airline. You must find out before you book a ticket. This may also affect your choice of destination or carrier.
→ The exact length of the flight, and whether delays are likely.
→ The facilities available at both airports. This includes assistance required with luggage, boarding the aircraft, wheelchair requirements and whether oxygen is available. If the holiday involves a long-haul flight, you should find out if time will be spent at a third airport for refuelling and how oxygen will be supplied there if required. With the exception of oxygen provision, these services will usually be free.
→ How you confirm your fitness to fly. Some airlines let you travel without a letter from your doctor, while others ask you to fill in a special medical form, verified either by your own GP or by the airline’s medical staff. Most ask for a fitness to fly certificate, obtained from your doctor.

Going on holiday to Norway soon?

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norway
DON’T LET THE USE OF OXYGEN CONFINE YOU!
Customers travel on land, air and sea using Portable Oxygen Concentrators .
The following International airlines approve the Inogen One, SeQual Eclipse and the Respironics EverGo: Air France, Air Canada, El Al Airlines, Alitalia, SAS Airlines, Lufthansa, Qantas, All Nipon Airways, ATA Airlines, Cathey Pacific, Icelandair, Norwegian, LTU International, Singapore Airlines, Swiss International, and Virgin Atlantic.
Many satisfied customers have used OxygenWorldwide for travelling to destinations such as Norway for their portable oxygen needs.
We have the equipment, we have the experience:

  • International or Domestic Travel
  • Back up service
  • Air Travel
  • Train Travel
  • 24 hour service

OxygenWorldwide has been a leader in servicing the needs of medical oxygen travelers. We are experienced in serving your medical, home and airline oxygen needs while you are on the go!

What is fit to fly?

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flying with medical oxygen

Most travellers with existing medical conditions are able to fly without difficulty. However, occasionally certain precautions need to be taken.
A fitness to fly form is required to be completed when:

  • Fitness to travel is in doubt as a result of recent illness, hospitalisation, injury or surgery
  • If you have an existing unstable medical condition
  • You wish to use medical equipment or therapeutic oxygen on-board

Most medical cases are straightforward, but some require individual assessment. In certain cases, we may ask that you and your doctor complete a “Fitness to Fly’ Form.

Carriage of a POC:

Passengers carrying a POC should obtain a Medical Equipment Approval & Baggage Waiver letter.   This approval & waiver letter must be presented at the Bag Drop desk or at the boarding gate if travelling with no checked baggage.

Use of POC during Flight:

If you wish to use a POC during flight, for the use onboard you will be required to complete a ‘Fit to Fly’ form which will be sent to the passenger once the requirement has been notified.   This completed “Fit to Fly’ form must be returned between 14 up to 2 days prior to travel for validation. The validated “Fit to Fly form must be carried by the passenger on all flights and produced to our cabin crew on boarding the aircraft.

If the POC is to be used onboard it is the passenger’s responsibility to ensure that they have a sufficient number of fully charged batteries for the duration of the flight and any possible delays, as POC or batteries cannot be charged on board.

Individual airline carriers have their own regulations please check before booking departure for full details.

For further info and back up service please contact our team at [email protected] or www.oxygenworldwide.com

For an example:

Please see below list of models approved for carriage on Ryanair flights:

AirSep FreeStyle (PDF)
AirSep LifeStyle (PDF)
AirSep Focus (PDF)
AirSep Freestyle 5 (PDF)
Delphi RS-00400 / Oxus RS-00400 (PDF)
DeVilbiss Healthcare iGo (PDF)
Inogen One (PDF)
Inogen One G2 (PDF)
lnogen One G3 (PDF)
lnova Labs LifeChoice Activox (PDF)
International Biophysics LifeChoice / lnova Labs LifeChoice (PDF)
Invacare XPO2 (PDF)
Invacare Solo 2 (PDF)
Oxylife Independence Oxygen Concentrator (PDF)
Precision Medical EasyPulse (PDF)
Respironics EverGo (PDF)
Respironics SimplyGo (PDF)
Sequal Eclipse (PDF)
SeQual SAROS (PDF)

 

Wiki Know-how for Oxygen and travel

Inogen-One-G3-dining
Oxygen was known to be the only element that supports respiration as early as 1800 and was first used in the medical field in 1810. However, it took about 150 years for the gas to be used throughout medicine. In the early to mid 20th century oxygen therapy became rational and scientific, and today modern medicine could not be practiced without the support that oxygen supplies.
Medical oxygen is used to:

  • provide a basis for virtually all modern anaesthetic techniques
  • restore tissue oxygen tension by improving oxygen availability in a wide range of conditions such as COPD, cyanosis, shock, severe hemorrhage, carbon monoxide poisoning, major trauma, cardiac/respiratory arrest
  • aid resuscitation
  • provide life support for artificially ventilated patients
  • reduce incidence of surgical wound infection
  • aid cardiovascular stability

Read our useful Wiki guide for all the information and explanations to do with travelling with medical oxygen with OxygenWorldwide.