100% oxygen, 100% care

Why OxygenWorldwide

We breathe air that is 21 percent oxygen, and we require oxygen to live. Here at OxygenWorldwide we provide 100% care 24/7 for those who require medical oxygen to survive.

Wikipedia definition
Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table, a highly reactive nonmetal, and an oxidizing agent that readily forms oxides with most elements as well as with other compounds.

01.Our years of experience. OxygenWorldwide has been arranging oxygen for travellers since 1993. 
02.Our worldwide contacts with oxygen suppliers and airport personnel. 
Read the rest and find out more about OxygenWorldwide services here


Trouble breathing? Shall I keep working….

When you are living with a condition this affects many areas of your life including your work, career and can cause additional stress upon youself. Employers should also take care and dewdiligence and there are many ways in which you can conitnue to successfully carry on working instead of long term disability.

Depending on your career and employment if you have conditions such as severe asthma, COPD or other respiratory diseases here are a few simple taks you can ask your employers to undertake so that you are able to perform to your best ability each day you go to work:

  • If you workplace is large then ground floor would be much easier if you require a desk space
  • Being flexible for doctor appointments and even working from home or remote working
  • Parking near to the entrance of your workplace or even reserve a space nearer for you
  • Being near windows to allow ventilation and air as and when you require

Take care of yourself and make sure you do what is comfortable for you, if you need to take your medical oxygen to work with you then do so and make appropriate arrangements with management and the HR teams.

What we do is care – look up our OxygenWorldwide services here to see what we do for travelling with medical oxygen to keep you moving and enjoying the best out of life. Do not let anything stop you and holidays are a certain way to visit the ones you love, see cultures and experience new sites. When you book your next holiday entitlement from your job then do let us know and we can assist with all your oxygen needs.

Asthma, which one do i have?

Although there are many different types of asthma, there are many patterns to which ones but they are all to do with inflammination of the airways. There are many types of asthma but mainly the follwoing ones listed here:

  • Allergic asthma
  • Non-allergic asthma
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis
  • Aspirin-induced asthma
  • Adult-onset asthma
  • Asthma with fixed airflow obstruction
  • Exercise-induced asthma
  • Cough-variant asthma
  • Work-related asthma
  • Nighttime (Nocturnal) asthma
  • Asthma with obesity

Asthma is a long term disese and even though there may be different types based on lung function and symptoms it can be controlled.

Breathing long-term

Life can bring many challenges and coping with a long-term illness can seem to affect every part of your life. Managing and self-management is the key to improving your well-being and coping with flare-ups and challenges.

Oxygen therapy is one major part to this and understanding the treatment and how it works will help you. Many people will feel some anxiety towards using medical oxygen long-term. We all need oxygen as this is our ‘fuel’ and if there is a lack of oxygen in the blood oxygen therapy is needed to keep the body functioning.
If there is a chronic lack of oxygen this can lead to fatigue, problems with memory and concentration or swelling of the legs amongst other complications.
Medical oxygen helps to keep your organs functioning sufficiently and maintain blood oxygen levels to what is needed for you to maintain a normal life.
Oxygen therapy is beneficial long-term, some may need it for 15 hours a day or whilst sleeping but you will feel the effects long-term to help you feel less tired, more movement even with exercising and better sleep.
ref: image by majamer

Can oxygen therapy prevent dementia???


Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the collective term for a group of lung conditions that cause long term breathing difficulties. It is a common condition affecting mainly middle-aged or older adults who smoke, with symptoms including breathlessness and a chesty ‘smokers’ cough. Individuals with COPD are at higher risk of dementia – one current theory suggests that this is due to lower brain oxygen levels as a result of problems with blood supply from blood vessels in the brain. In line with this theory, some studies have reported that giving COPD patients additional oxygen reduced their risk of developing dementia. However, until now, the mechanisms underlying this positive effect had not been fully investigated.
The research team found that blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain was significantly increased during reading. This was due to blood vessels in the brain becoming dilated in response to the greater oxygen demand when the brain was active. It can thus be concluded that when COPD patients receive additional oxygen it improves the function of blood vessels in their brain.
This study showed that providing extra oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brain by matching blood supply to the demands of the brain activity. However, COPD patients typically use this extra oxygen therapy throughout the day and for long periods of time, potentially years. This study does not indicate the influence of long term oxygen therapy on the function of blood vessels in the brain. Despite these potential limitations, this work has set the foundation for the researchers to investigate the biological systems that control oxygen delivery to the brain.
references: http://www.physoc.org/

Getting 'high' on air…

Even the healthiest person would find it difficult to breathe during the warm and very damp weather in the summer season. The patients ailing with a chronic lung disease such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis have to be very careful. Surprisingly COPD is more common in women than men. Literally, 37% of women are more likely to have COPD than men.
Good nutrition means healthy eating. You need good nutrition to make your body stronger. You should eat a variety of foods every day. When you have COPD, preparing food and eating large meals may lead to shortness of breath. Here are some ways to help prevent shortness of breath.
Eat 6 small meals each day, instead of 3 large meals. 

Chewing and digesting food uses up oxygen. When you eat a small meal, you use up less oxygen than when you eat a large meal. In addition, a large meal fills your stomach. A full stomach presses on your diaphragm. The diaphragm is the main muscle we use to breathe. When your stomach presses on your diaphragm, it is harder for you to breathe.
Eat slowly, and breathe evenly
Avoid gas-forming foods like:

  • All beans (except green beans)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Melons
  • Onions
  • Raw apples
  • Turnips

Your doctor will prescribe the type of oxygen device, the flow rate, and how and when to use it. When traveling OxygenWorldwide can supply in over 120 countries and take any stress out of the arranging of your oxygen supply.
 
ref: http://www.upmc.com

The sun could help to treat asthma

The summer has finally started to rear its head and for many people who suffer from respiratory disease the summer months can potentially worsen their condition. An increase in air pollution, pollen, dust and other allergens can irritate the lungs and worsen breathing. The general advice is to stay indoors at peak pollen or air pollution times. However on the flip-side of this advice is that exposure to the sun may actually be good for you, especially asthma sufferers.
autumn-sun
A study by King’s College London has found that the Vitamin D that the sun provides may have a calming impact with asthma sufferers as Vitamin D helps to lower an asthmatic’s over-active part of their immune system.
Many asthmatics have high levels of Interleukin-17, which causes part of their immune system to be over-active and contributes to their respiratory reactions to allergens and is part of the cause of some asthma attacks. Some asthmatic sufferers do not respond to steroid treatment and find difficulty in managing their symptoms. This group of asthmatics tends to have very high levels of Interleukin-17.
Researchers have found that if Vitamin D levels are increased then this lowers the levels of Interleukin-17 and helps to calm down the immune system leading to a lessening of symptoms.
“We know people with high levels of vitamin D are better able to control their asthma – that connection is quite striking,” said researcher Prof Catherine Hawrylowicz.
The sun is an easy natural source of Vitamin D (the body can make Vitamin D in the presence of sunshine) rather than taking synthetic supplements so the more you are out in the sun, the more Vitamin D your body will get and the happier your immune system.
Many asthma sufferers also have concerns about the side effects of their medications so if Vitamin D is shown to improve their condition then many may have to rely less on medication and can improve their quality of life.
Researchers have suggested that covering up too much and using too much sun cream has actually contributed to increased asthma rates. Obviously too much sun is bad for you and you should ensure that you protect your skin to avoid sunburn and potential skin cancers.
So there needs to be a balance of going outside and increasing your levels of Vitamin D versus avoiding high pollen counts and sunburn.
Here are a few tips to help you enjoy the summer despite your condition:
•    Check the Air Quality Index: Avoid peak times or areas with poor air quality.
•    Always Take Your Medication:  Whether this is ant-histamines, inhalers, steroids or supplemental oxygen.
•    Check the Pollen Count: Try to avoid going out at times where pollen is particularly high.
•    Use Air Conditioning Instead of Opening Windows: Open windows will just allow more pollen and allergens into your home or the car.
•    Wash regularly: Washing your hair and clothes regularly gets rid of any allergens that may have settled on you.
•    Talk to your doctor for advice.
References:      http://www.healthoxygen.com and http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health

Sun rays and COPD living in the summer

Summer is on its way and this means we are exposed to a lot more summer related allergies and with COPD even though there are multiple contributors to COPD such as tobacco smoke, occupational dusts, chemicals and air pollution, vitamin D and sun deficiencies may also play a role.  Research has demonstrated that the severity of the disease is correlated directly to levels of vitamin D, and other research demonstrates that severe disturbed lung and peripheral muscle functions are more pronounced in COPD patients with vitamin D deficiency. In addition, recent research shows that cardiopulmonary exercise capacity is increased remarkably in people with high vitamin D levels compared to those with low levels. Of course, 90% of vitamin D blood levels are produced by sun exposure.
One may intelligently conclude, based on this information, that a part of the cause for both diseases is a lack of sun-derived vitamin D.
 
ref: http://sunlightinstitute.org/does-does-sun-exposure-have-an-influence-on-copd/

Does your crying make it hard to breathe?

Asthma  results in difficulty in breathing, cough, excessive mucus secretion, and wheezing sounds during breathing.

An episode of asthma can be induced by a variety of triggers. Broadly, they can be categorized into two types: external triggers and internal triggers.
A vast majority of asthma triggers are external – exposure to an allergen. Pollens, dust mites, cockroach parts, and the dander of rodents or of other animals are known allergens that affect many individuals. Another category of common allergens include pollutants in the air. Smoke from charcoal grills or open fires, strong fumes of chemicals such as gasoline and paints, or even strong scents of perfumes and soaps may induce irritation of airways in certain people.
Food ingredients comprise another category of external asthma triggers. Several people have been reported to be allergic to food substances such as peanuts, soy, eggs, shrimp, cow milk, fish, wheat, and certain fruits.
Strenuous exercise is also capable of inducing asthma by causing airway constriction (also referred to as “exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.
In some patients with very sensitive respiratory systems, even minor changes in weather or climatic conditions such as a drop in temperature, rise in altitude, or change in humidity levels can induce severe asthma episodes acutely.
While most triggers for asthma are external, there are a few which are internal, and these may often be ignored while analyzing the condition’s etiology.
Expression of strong emotions is often associated with asthma. Intense anger, excitement, crying, as well as laughing may aggravate airway constriction. Crying also causes stuffiness of the nose in most individuals, and thus makes it more difficult for them to breathe.
 
ref: https://www.news-medical.net

Getting 'high' on air…

Even the healthiest person would find it difficult to breathe during the warm and very damp weather in the summer season. The patients ailing with a chronic lung disease such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis have to be very careful. Surprisingly COPD is more common in women than men. Literally, 37% of women are more likely to have COPD than men.
Good nutrition means healthy eating. You need good nutrition to make your body stronger. You should eat a variety of foods every day. When you have COPD, preparing food and eating large meals may lead to shortness of breath. Here are some ways to help prevent shortness of breath.
Eat 6 small meals each day, instead of 3 large meals. 

Chewing and digesting food uses up oxygen. When you eat a small meal, you use up less oxygen than when you eat a large meal. In addition, a large meal fills your stomach. A full stomach presses on your diaphragm. The diaphragm is the main muscle we use to breathe. When your stomach presses on your diaphragm, it is harder for you to breathe.
Eat slowly, and breathe evenly
Avoid gas-forming foods like:

  • All beans (except green beans)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Melons
  • Onions
  • Raw apples
  • Turnips

Your doctor will prescribe the type of oxygen device, the flow rate, and how and when to use it. When traveling OxygenWorldwide can supply in over 120 countries and take any stress out of the arranging of your oxygen supply.
 
ref: http://www.upmc.com