Trouble breathing? Shall I keep working….

When you are living with a condition this affects many areas of your life including your work, career and can cause additional stress upon youself. Employers should also take care and dewdiligence and there are many ways in which you can conitnue to successfully carry on working instead of long term disability.

Depending on your career and employment if you have conditions such as severe asthma, COPD or other respiratory diseases here are a few simple taks you can ask your employers to undertake so that you are able to perform to your best ability each day you go to work:

  • If you workplace is large then ground floor would be much easier if you require a desk space
  • Being flexible for doctor appointments and even working from home or remote working
  • Parking near to the entrance of your workplace or even reserve a space nearer for you
  • Being near windows to allow ventilation and air as and when you require

Take care of yourself and make sure you do what is comfortable for you, if you need to take your medical oxygen to work with you then do so and make appropriate arrangements with management and the HR teams.

What we do is care – look up our OxygenWorldwide services here to see what we do for travelling with medical oxygen to keep you moving and enjoying the best out of life. Do not let anything stop you and holidays are a certain way to visit the ones you love, see cultures and experience new sites. When you book your next holiday entitlement from your job then do let us know and we can assist with all your oxygen needs.

Christmas and not letting COPD or Asthma get in the way of having fun…

christmas-tree

At this time of year as the nights draw in common colds and flu associated with the cold weather start to appear. This doesn’t help anyone with respiratory illnesses. Christmas also brings on added stress and also excitement that may trigger asthma attacks.One of the best things you can do to make sure you have a symptom-free Christmas is to plan ahead.

Make sure you stock up on much needed medicines. Take extra care when you purchase your all important Christmas tree which can trigger attached even in artificial trees whereas real trees carry mould that breathes in warm areas so if you can place your tree in a cool area this would be better.

If you’re planning to travel this Christmas – whether it’s to visit friends or family, or go on holiday – planning ahead can help prevent problems and help you make the most of your festive time away. Small things such as dust can trigger asthma when staying at friends and family houses. Carrying anitihistamines can help or explaining to family to dust down and vacuum before you stay could help.

If you are travelling abroad then be sure to plan in advance as many places are not open all the time. Our team of experts will help plan your medical oxygen needs leaving you to enjoy and relax your special memories with your friends and family.

Just the ticket…

Here at OxygenWorldwide we treat all our customers not just like a number. We as a team have been looking after our customers to travel with no stress with medical oxygen in over 50 countries across the globe.

Many of our customers travel with COPD, asthma, bronchitus, respiratory problems to name a few and are delighted that our services help them have their long awaited vacation, visit their loved ones many times a year.

Travelling with medical oxygen seems complicated but speak to one of our advisors and the dream can become a reality.

Can oxygen therapy prevent dementia???


Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the collective term for a group of lung conditions that cause long term breathing difficulties. It is a common condition affecting mainly middle-aged or older adults who smoke, with symptoms including breathlessness and a chesty ‘smokers’ cough. Individuals with COPD are at higher risk of dementia – one current theory suggests that this is due to lower brain oxygen levels as a result of problems with blood supply from blood vessels in the brain. In line with this theory, some studies have reported that giving COPD patients additional oxygen reduced their risk of developing dementia. However, until now, the mechanisms underlying this positive effect had not been fully investigated.
The research team found that blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain was significantly increased during reading. This was due to blood vessels in the brain becoming dilated in response to the greater oxygen demand when the brain was active. It can thus be concluded that when COPD patients receive additional oxygen it improves the function of blood vessels in their brain.
This study showed that providing extra oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brain by matching blood supply to the demands of the brain activity. However, COPD patients typically use this extra oxygen therapy throughout the day and for long periods of time, potentially years. This study does not indicate the influence of long term oxygen therapy on the function of blood vessels in the brain. Despite these potential limitations, this work has set the foundation for the researchers to investigate the biological systems that control oxygen delivery to the brain.
references: http://www.physoc.org/

Getting 'high' on air…

Even the healthiest person would find it difficult to breathe during the warm and very damp weather in the summer season. The patients ailing with a chronic lung disease such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis have to be very careful. Surprisingly COPD is more common in women than men. Literally, 37% of women are more likely to have COPD than men.
Good nutrition means healthy eating. You need good nutrition to make your body stronger. You should eat a variety of foods every day. When you have COPD, preparing food and eating large meals may lead to shortness of breath. Here are some ways to help prevent shortness of breath.
Eat 6 small meals each day, instead of 3 large meals. 

Chewing and digesting food uses up oxygen. When you eat a small meal, you use up less oxygen than when you eat a large meal. In addition, a large meal fills your stomach. A full stomach presses on your diaphragm. The diaphragm is the main muscle we use to breathe. When your stomach presses on your diaphragm, it is harder for you to breathe.
Eat slowly, and breathe evenly
Avoid gas-forming foods like:

  • All beans (except green beans)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Melons
  • Onions
  • Raw apples
  • Turnips

Your doctor will prescribe the type of oxygen device, the flow rate, and how and when to use it. When traveling OxygenWorldwide can supply in over 120 countries and take any stress out of the arranging of your oxygen supply.
 
ref: http://www.upmc.com

Sun rays and COPD living in the summer

Summer is on its way and this means we are exposed to a lot more summer related allergies and with COPD even though there are multiple contributors to COPD such as tobacco smoke, occupational dusts, chemicals and air pollution, vitamin D and sun deficiencies may also play a role.  Research has demonstrated that the severity of the disease is correlated directly to levels of vitamin D, and other research demonstrates that severe disturbed lung and peripheral muscle functions are more pronounced in COPD patients with vitamin D deficiency. In addition, recent research shows that cardiopulmonary exercise capacity is increased remarkably in people with high vitamin D levels compared to those with low levels. Of course, 90% of vitamin D blood levels are produced by sun exposure.
One may intelligently conclude, based on this information, that a part of the cause for both diseases is a lack of sun-derived vitamin D.
 
ref: http://sunlightinstitute.org/does-does-sun-exposure-have-an-influence-on-copd/

Getting 'high' on air…

Even the healthiest person would find it difficult to breathe during the warm and very damp weather in the summer season. The patients ailing with a chronic lung disease such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis have to be very careful. Surprisingly COPD is more common in women than men. Literally, 37% of women are more likely to have COPD than men.
Good nutrition means healthy eating. You need good nutrition to make your body stronger. You should eat a variety of foods every day. When you have COPD, preparing food and eating large meals may lead to shortness of breath. Here are some ways to help prevent shortness of breath.
Eat 6 small meals each day, instead of 3 large meals. 

Chewing and digesting food uses up oxygen. When you eat a small meal, you use up less oxygen than when you eat a large meal. In addition, a large meal fills your stomach. A full stomach presses on your diaphragm. The diaphragm is the main muscle we use to breathe. When your stomach presses on your diaphragm, it is harder for you to breathe.
Eat slowly, and breathe evenly
Avoid gas-forming foods like:

  • All beans (except green beans)
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Melons
  • Onions
  • Raw apples
  • Turnips

Your doctor will prescribe the type of oxygen device, the flow rate, and how and when to use it. When traveling OxygenWorldwide can supply in over 120 countries and take any stress out of the arranging of your oxygen supply.
 
ref: http://www.upmc.com

Taking the breath of life

People with a lung condition can get short of breath but The British Lung Foundation have set out the following tips for breathing exercises to help the shortness of breath and breathe more easily each day.

  • relaxed slow deep breathing: breathe in gently through your nose and breathe out through your nose and mouth. Try to feel relaxed and calm each time you breathe out.
  • pursed-lips breathing: breathe in gently through your nose and breathe out with your lips pursed as if you are whistling.
  • blow as you go: use this when you’re doing something that makes you breathless, such as standing up. Breathe in before you make the effort. Then breathe out while making the effort. Try using pursed lips as you breathe out.
  • paced breathing: this is useful when you’re active, such as climbing stairs. You pace your steps to your breathing. For example, breathe in when on the stair, and breathe out as you go up a stair.

Try to practise them every day. They can also help if you get out of breath suddenly. Being in control of your breathing means breathing gently, using the least effort, with your shoulders supported and relaxed.
Great advice!
 

travel by car with medical oxygen

A great resource over at COPD.net on the safety tips of travelling with oxygen.
car travel with oxygenDo’s

  • DO fill the portable tank carefully, if using liquid oxygen. Liquid oxygen is extremely cold and can injure your hands, if frost should develop.
  • DO carry your portable tank only in the case supplied with it.
  • DO use a cart or holster to carry portable oxygen cylinders.
  • DO keep your oxygen delivery system out of the bright sunlight or other heat sources.
  • DO secure your tank, cylinder or portable concentrator so it does not roll around in the car. Liquid tanks should never be laid on their sides; portable cylinders may be.
  • DO bring extra batteries to power your concentrator.

Don’ts

  • DON’T put a portable tank inside a backpack or other carry bag.
  • DON’T place your tank, cylinder or portable concentrator in a car trunk or other tightly enclosed space.

There are quite a few DO’s for you to remember and t is always best to be prepared before embarking on a week or two away on holiday. Any advice needed on arranging oxygen please do just speak with the team at OxygenWorldwide.
 
ref: https://copd.net/living/traveling-with-oxygen/