Sing until your heart is content…

Now for all of you out there who may enjoy a sing in the shower, bursting out at home whilst cleaning, singing along to your Alexa or Google hone so of you may who may not sing either but have lung problems or breathing difficulties read this!

Even listening to music can help you mentally feel much happier, positive and upbeat (pardon the pun!). This is turn will make you feel so much healthier in day to day life. You may already take part in a singing group or just as a hobby at home or in the car but it is said that due to its positivity an improvement in your health will ultimately help you. Music and other creative activities can make you feel healthier and more positive. There’s increasing evidence that singing regularly as part of a group is good for your soul and health. It seems to be especially good at improving your quality of life if you’re living with a lung condition.

There are no excuses to improve your health with a lung condition especially those who have medical oxygen to aid breathing to make sure you…

Sing to your heart’s content

Now its time to play your favourite classic record, turn on your favourite radio station or watch and discover new music on YouTube or spotify. Create your own set of playlists for you to listen to depending on your mood that day.

Whether this is rock, pop, jazz, swing or simple melodies, classical or rap – any genre of music and singing will improve your well-being.

What country beginning with A is safe to breathe?

So one country claims they are the perfect holiday destination for those who suffer from breathing allergies but which ‘A is it???

The Alps in Austria are full of fresh mountain air, low pollen counts and ideal temperatures. Destinations such as the National Park district of Krimml, Tyrolean alps or Obergurgl pine forest are advertised as the perfect holiday for allergy and asthma sufferers with its high altitude levels and cleansed air.

So if you are stuck for a holiday destination that will help you breathe easy take a look at Austria, if the mountains and pine forests are not your chosen holiday then there is always a nice sunny beach in Spain for relaxation and sunshine!

View all the countries we can deliver medical oxygen to when you are away on holiday.

Trouble breathing? Shall I keep working….

When you are living with a condition this affects many areas of your life including your work, career and can cause additional stress upon youself. Employers should also take care and dewdiligence and there are many ways in which you can conitnue to successfully carry on working instead of long term disability.

Depending on your career and employment if you have conditions such as severe asthma, COPD or other respiratory diseases here are a few simple taks you can ask your employers to undertake so that you are able to perform to your best ability each day you go to work:

  • If you workplace is large then ground floor would be much easier if you require a desk space
  • Being flexible for doctor appointments and even working from home or remote working
  • Parking near to the entrance of your workplace or even reserve a space nearer for you
  • Being near windows to allow ventilation and air as and when you require

Take care of yourself and make sure you do what is comfortable for you, if you need to take your medical oxygen to work with you then do so and make appropriate arrangements with management and the HR teams.

What we do is care – look up our OxygenWorldwide services here to see what we do for travelling with medical oxygen to keep you moving and enjoying the best out of life. Do not let anything stop you and holidays are a certain way to visit the ones you love, see cultures and experience new sites. When you book your next holiday entitlement from your job then do let us know and we can assist with all your oxygen needs.

Cheer Cheer …

Stay cheered up with a cuppa

When you are lying in bed or sitting on the sofa at home wishing you weren’t ill. You just want to go to bed and sleep to forget everything for that little moment of time. From time to time we all feel sorry for ourselves, especially with chronic or long-term sickness.

Here are a few ideas on how to cheer up your loved ones and bring a little smile:

Keep Your Distance. Why not send an uplifting bouquet of flowers or leave a care package at her doorstep? Send a quick text message or post on socials. Just remember – while it may feel odd and callous to you not to visit her face-to-face, most likely she would rather stay in bed than try to have a conversation. 

Take on the to-do list. Help by offering to take on a task or two – maybe walk the dog, shop for food, or pick up kids from school. Every little task you can take off will be a huge blessing; you can believe it!

Be Warm. Think about your friend and what seems to comfort them in tough situations. Maybe a long soak in a warm tub with a great book?  Or a nice cupp a tea? Personalised gifts will not only comfort her aching body, but will also warm her heart.

In need of oxygen?

Do you need oxygen?

We have a team of experts for all your medical oxygen needs. 24/7 contact when you are one of our customers, available to 120 countries and we speak 5 languages.

When it comes to your health you need knowledgable, caring and friendly experts to help plan and guide you or help you when you need us.

OxygenWorldwide is a company for all your medical oxygen needs whilst traveling.

Christmas and not letting COPD or Asthma get in the way of having fun…

christmas-tree

At this time of year as the nights draw in common colds and flu associated with the cold weather start to appear. This doesn’t help anyone with respiratory illnesses. Christmas also brings on added stress and also excitement that may trigger asthma attacks.One of the best things you can do to make sure you have a symptom-free Christmas is to plan ahead.

Make sure you stock up on much needed medicines. Take extra care when you purchase your all important Christmas tree which can trigger attached even in artificial trees whereas real trees carry mould that breathes in warm areas so if you can place your tree in a cool area this would be better.

If you’re planning to travel this Christmas – whether it’s to visit friends or family, or go on holiday – planning ahead can help prevent problems and help you make the most of your festive time away. Small things such as dust can trigger asthma when staying at friends and family houses. Carrying anitihistamines can help or explaining to family to dust down and vacuum before you stay could help.

If you are travelling abroad then be sure to plan in advance as many places are not open all the time. Our team of experts will help plan your medical oxygen needs leaving you to enjoy and relax your special memories with your friends and family.

Are women fitter than men?

A new study shows that when women exercise, their body processes oxygen a lot faster than men’s. This indicates superior aerobic fitness, explain the researchers. In other words, women may be naturally fitter than men.
man and woman ready for running

But new research challenges the traditional belief that men are athletically superior to women. In fact, by measuring women’s response to aerobic training, a new study suggests that the opposite may be true.
The new study examined sex differences in the body’s response to aerobic fitness; more specifically, it focused on how sex affects the body’s ability to process oxygen once it starts to exercise.
Thomas Beltrame, from the University of Waterloo in Canada, led the research, and the findings were published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism.
 
Oxygen uptake is a standard measure of aerobic fitness, and it describes the amount of oxygen that the body can take in and use per minute.
As the American College of Sports Medicine explain, our oxygen consumption rate “provides a measure of the maximal ability to perform high-intensity aerobic work, [and] is strongly associated with performance and health.”
Therefore, a higher rate of oxygen processing means that women may be less prone to muscle fatigue and more likely to perform better athletically. They may also be more resilient, as higher oxygen processing also indicates a lower perception of physical effort.
“The findings are contrary to the popular assumption that men’s bodies are more naturally athletic,” Beltrame says.

Oxygen therapy treat Alzheimer's?

Breathing oxygen at a higher-than-normal air pressure might ease some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, if recent research done in mice has the same results in humans.

Mice genetically engineered to develop some human features of Alzheimer’s disease showed significant reductions in physical and behavioral symptoms after 2 weeks of daily treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT).
This was the result that a team hailing from the University of Tel Aviv (TAU) in Israel reported in a paper that was published recently in the journal Neurobiology of Aging.
HBOT is a type of treatment during which the person breathes oxygen at a pressure that is greater than normal air pressure. The treatment, which is delivered inside a pressurized chamber, can cause the lungs to absorb up to three times more oxygen than usual.
The researchers note in their study paper that, while HBOT “has been used successfully to treat several neurological conditions,” its effects on Alzheimer’s disease “have never been thoroughly examined.”

In a hyperbaric oxygen chamber that they custom-built for the small animals, the researchers gave the transgenic mice 1 hour of HBOT every day for 14 days. They also gave another group of normal mice (the controls) the same treatment.
After this, the team observed the mice as they completed a number of behavioral tests. They also examined their brain tissue for effects of the treatment on the physical hallmarks of Alzheimer’s. They compared the results with the control mice.
The researchers’ analysis showed various biological and biochemical signs that HBOT had reduced inflammation in the brain.
 
The team suggests that the findings show that HBOT shows promise as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, especially given that it “is used in the clinic to treat various indications, including neurological conditions.”
 

references https://www.medicalnewstoday.com

Christmas trees could trigger deadly asthma attacks, doctors have warned.

christmas-tree
The festive fir in the corner of your living room harbours mould, which can aggravate the lungs.
Leading charity Asthma UK has urged people to be vigilant over the Christmas period.
Their data shows around 300 people are admitted to hospital on Christmas Day each year, suffering severe attacks, that could be linked to the festive favourite.
Mould that naturally grows on your tree can multiply in the warm temperatures of your living room.
And fake trees aren’t the safe alternative they may seem to be, gathering dust and mould in the loft, that can aggravate the lungs.
But, those with allergies as well as asthma sufferers should be alert to the dangers, Asthma UK urged. The moulds are naturally occurring on the trees, but flourish when they are inside our toasty warm homes in the winter.
But the charity also warns that both real and fake trees can also pose a threat.
 
Fake trees are a great alternative if the allergens that form on a real tree cause you too many breathing difficulties.
But artificial trees, and decorations, can gather dust and mould when they are kept in storage for the year which can cause a flare-up of symptoms when you put it up.
So it’s a good idea to wipe them down when you pull it out of storage and wrap them in plastic to keep the dust at bay when you put them away again.
 
 
 
reference: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/4981922/warning-doctors-christmas-tree-deadly-asthma-attacks/

How to avoid catching a cold on public transport

As any commuter will tell you, the threat of catching a cold is everywhere – from your sniffling co-passenger to that handrail everyone’s been touching. And it’s not just paranoia; one study by the University of Nottingham in 2011 found those who use public buses or trams were up to six times more likely to catch the common cold.

In fact, up to 15% of the population will be struck down with a cold virus during the winter months, according to data from the World Health Organization.

Here are some top tips to help you avoid picking up a cough or cold on public transport this winter.

As sneezes and coughs can travel a large distance very quickly, standing sideways to them is safer than standing directly opposite. If they do sneeze or cough, try not to breathe in for a few seconds.

Surfaces like handles, buttons and handrails are key places for cold viruses to linger, but whether you pick them up depends on the length of time the virus has been on the surface, the amount of virus deposited by an infected person and, if you then transfer the bugs by touching your eyes and nose, the ‘optimal portal’ for entry.

If you see a sick person touching certain surfaces, avoid contact with the same ones but if you have to, definitely don’t touch your nose or eyes afterwards.

There is no particular ‘hotspot’ for colds and other viruses on public transport; it can be any place where people’s hands leave behind a reasonable amount of virus that will then be touched by another person. Be aware of escalator handrails, ticket machines, maps, etc too, not just the handrails on the bus or Tube.

When you’re on the go, use an alcohol-based antibacterial hand gel, known to kill viruses, after taking public transport. However, washing your hands with soap and water is best, so do that when you arrive at work or get home. If you’re really worried, it doesn’t hurt to wipe down any handrails with an antiseptic wipe.

  • Try to sit in emptier areas such as the back of the bus, or in train carriages which are less full than others – this minimises your risk of sitting near infected people.

  • If you are on a train with windows, try to open them to get as much ventilation as possible – this reduces your risk of breathing in airborne viruses.

And if you’re the one with the cold? Stay at home – as well as protecting your fellow commuters, your colleagues will thank you for not spreading those germs all around the office too.

references: https://patient.info/health/common-cold-upper-respiratory-tract-infections/features/how-to-avoid-catching-a-cold-on-public-transport