Flying with Transavia?

aeroplane in sunset sky

Transavia airline’s website now describes how you can pre-order and request medical oxygen for your flight. This would be at a cost of 75€ per 400 Litres. This could be a great sign that other airlines will follow suit. Here the cost is clear for anyone needing this requirement. The airline simply request the following conditions:

  • You are able to operate the device yourself.
    Or you are travelling together with someone (aged 16 or over) who can provide assistance.
  • You require a signed medical certificate in English from an independent physician or specialist.
    The required number of litres of oxygen per minute is stated. The certificate must also state whether the oxygen is on stand-by or continuous. The medical certificate must be issued no later than 7 days before the departure of your flight and is required for all flights to and from the Netherlands.
  • You require less than 1,500 litres of oxygen per flight.
    If you require more oxygen, it is not possible to fly due to safety regulations.
  • You may not use your own oxygen bottles in the plane.
    You may take empty oxygen containers with you for use at the destination. These will be transported as hold luggage.
  • Oxygen can only be requested for flights departing and arriving at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, Rotterdam The Hague Airport and Eindhoven Airport.
    Please note that extra oxygen tanks cannot be requested for flights departing from and arriving in Belgium and France. One exception to this is the Amsterdam-Paris (Orly) route

Please read full details over on their website: https://www.transavia.com/help/en-eu/medical-services-assistance/flying-with-extra-oxygen/request-extra-oxygen

How technology is helping health get better

device with heart symbol for health

We rely on devices, internet and apps for so many areas of our lives now. From monitoring our steps, ordering online to keeping connected with others as well as reading books, listening to podcasts and researching news. Health is catching up with new ways to use technology to connect people especially those that are vulnerable.

CPI look at making huge advances in this area – a company that helps connect innovators with ideas.

This huge step forward could help create many health related benefits to so many people across the world. From knowing when your asthma inhaler needs replacing to data analytics and sending users notifications and reminders to take medication.

A very valuable concept for many now everything is moving to digital with easy and wide access to all from a device such as your mobile smart phone or tablet.

For any oxygen therapy needs please do take a look at our website here. We have many years experience of helping patients travel and keep moving across the globe with medical oxygen.


List of airlines that allow portable oxygen

aeroplane

Always check before booking your flight as details and policies may change. These airlines have allowed portable oxygen concentrators you can reach out to their websites for further information and to confirm their conditions.

Aegean Airlines
Aer Lingus
Air Canada
Air China
Air France
Air Iceland
Air New Zealand
Air Malta
Air Tahiti Nui
Airtran Airways
Alaska Airlines
American Airlines
Alitalia
All Nippon Airways
Allegiant Air
American Airlines
Avianca Airlines
British Airways
China Southern Airlines
Continental Airlines
Delta
EasyJet
Emirates
Frontier
Hawaiian Airlines
Iberia
Icelandair
Japanese Airlines
Jet Blue
KLM
Lufthansa
Mango
Qantas
Ryanair
Singapore Airlines
South African Airways
Southwest
Sun Country
Swiss Air Lines
Turkish Airlines
United Airlines
US Airways
Virgin Atlantic
Virgin Australia
WestJet Airlines

Also refer to our website here for countries we can deliver oxygen to once at your destination.

3 important things to send when arranging oxygen abroad

It is important to arrange your medical oxygen when traveling in advance. OxygenWorldwide provide oxygen across the globe daily for clients who need a supply of medical oxygen whilst away from home for business or pleasure. Here are our team’s top 3 checklist when contacting us.

  1. Your name address need to be exact. Similar to when you book tickets the documentation needs to be delivered to the correct person and the exact location. It is important to make sure you send the spelling of your name and destination address exactly. This will avoid any incorrect deliveries and confusion at your destination.
  2. The oxygen usage is also vital to make sure that the litres needed per hour and per minute for medical reasons are correct.
  3. Lastly your local contact details are just as important. Please see our previous post here to understand in more detail.
filling out form online

If you are planning a vacation or travel to another country please do contact our specialist team who are able to help plan your medical oxygen supply whilst away. Our team deal with all languages and we have forms easily translated. Please see below some useful links:

sauerstoffweltweit.com  (Deutsch)

oxygene.services (Francais)

oxigeno.info (Español)

oxy.support (English)

Please see our website for full details and where we deliver to across the world.

Medical oxygen and travel

aeroplane

Medical oxygen need is increasing across Europe and the world especially now with more respiratory problems since the pandemic. Whether travelling for pleasure or business these air travellers can have difficulty planning the trip. It has been common for travellers to not understand fully how to plan or for an airline to be slow in response.

Just remember:

  • Plan as far in advance as possibly
  • Contact your chosen airline to advise them of your requirements
  • When you book seats possibly try to be near the toilets and the aisle
  • You oxygen supplier at your destination is responsible for back ups and training
  • Make sure you leave enough time so the travel is not stressful or exhausting

OxygenWorldwide have been arranging medical oxygen for holiday for over 20 years so please feel free to discuss your requirements with the team here

What is medical oxygen?

medical oxygen cylinder

Oxygen therapy, also known as supplemental oxygen, is the use of oxygen as medical treatment. Acute indications for therapy include hypoxemia, carbon monoxide toxicity and cluster headache. It may also be prophylactically given to maintain blood oxygen levels during the induction of anaesthesia. Wikipedia

Medical oxygen as a term has become much more well-known since the pandemic with the crisis of oxygen needed globally due to Covid-19. This form of oxygen allows many patients to have the ability to take in oxygen and be able to do many daily things that we take for granted such as move around, light exercise and even travel with medical oxygen and see the world!

Medical oxygen is prescribed for patients suffering from COPD, chronic asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory diseases.

To read more resources please do visit OxygenWorldwide for information on medical oxygen and travel.


Does Your Gender Dictate Your Oxygen Consumption?

A new study has found that women require more oxygen when breathing when compared to men. It was discovered that during exercise the muscles around the diaphragm and ribcage that are needed for breathing consume more oxygen in women than in men.

gender
gender

As more oxygen is required by the respiratory muscles to breathe, women consume more energy and require a higher oxygen intake, which increases during exercise. Therefore women need to breathe more to compensate for this increased oxygen requirement.
Previous research indicated that women’s airways ate narrower than men’s, even when both have the same sized lungs and therefore moving the same amount of oxygen through the airways costs more energy-wise for women than for men.
The study also suggested that if women’s respiratory muscles require more oxygen then blood flow is directed here and may be reduced from other parts of the body such as the leg muscles and for cardiac output. Therefore the physical performance of other parts of the body may decrease due to the focus of the body to concentrate the oxygen to travel mainly to the respiratory muscles.
The findings could prove important in the treatment of lung disorders, as a reduced lung capacity combined with harder working muscles may lead to a higher energy demand, with it being greater in women. These findings could be important in the clinical management of people with lung disorders and lead to more focus on the gender of the patient as to how best to treat them such as altering their fitness programs.

References: http://health.usnews.com and http://www.foxnews.com

Fit to fly?

 
Billions of us travel by air each year however we are all individuals with varying needs, including a range of medical conditions and all airlines have different policies regarding this. For example some airlines will require a medical certificate to prove that you fit to fly.
plane2
The airline needs to ensure that air travel will not worsen or agitate a pre-existing condition and also that the patient’s ailment will not affect the comfort or safety of other passengers on the flight. Regardless of a doctor’s medical certificate the final decision remains with the airline and the captain of the flight and they may still refuse carriage.
A main considering factor involved in this decision making process is the affect of altitude, humidity and oxygen saturation levels during flight. Modern aircraft have a cabin altitude pressure equivalent of between 5,000 and 8,000 feet above sea level. (source: cyprusairways.com) This means that your blood will not be as saturated with oxygen and can affect breathing, cardiac activity, circulation and brain activity. Sometimes during flight, although not normally for long periods of time, a person’s oxygen saturation level can fall to 90%. A healthy individual can tolerate this temporary change with no problems however a patient with cardiac, anaemia or respiratory problems may find themselves in serious difficulties.
Aircraft cabins have low humidity levels that dry out the air; this can cause dryness of the skin or other mucous membranes within the body such as the throat and lungs and affect respiration.
Reduced cabin pressure can also cause gas volume expansion. Any gas that may have inadvertently been introduced to the body during surgery could then expand and cause pain or even perforation through the membrane.
A main deciding factor in whether or not a person may be considered ‘fit to fly’ is their oxygen saturation level. If a person’s saturation level is equal to, or more than 95%, they do not need oxygen for flying. If an asthma sufferer has a stable status then they should be able to fly as long as they keep their medication to hand. Anyone with an active exacerbation of respiratory disease should wait until their condition has improved before considering to fly. Consultation with a doctor or respiratory specialist will aid in ascertaining whether it is wise to fly or whether additional aids or medication would be wise to use during the flight. This may also help to persuade the airline that you are fit to fly.
As passengers sometimes cannot take their own oxygen equipment on board due to regulatory requirements although this is changing and more and more POC’s (portable oxygen concentrators) are allowed on board of the aircraft.

If a passenger has used oxygen provided by the airline company he or she will have to pre-arrange oxygen at the end of the flight. OxygenWorldwide does provide an Airport Service where they have somone waiting at the door of the aircraft to hand over a portable oxygen device so one can travel onwards to their hotel or other holiday destination.
Please check with OxygenWoldwide for availability on your destination

A safe and happy flight with portable oxygen

Just because you need to travel with medical oxygen, this need not restrict the opportunities to travel overseas it just takes a little bit more planning. Flying with a Disability offers you the following advice to ensure a safe, happy flight. 
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Travellers who require oxygen for medical use are, unfortunately, subject to a charge per bottle. This rate varies between airline, and can be quite expensive. You will need to contact the airline at least 48hrs prior to flying to advise the flow rate, and to get full medical clearance, though this tends to be minor technicality. 
Charges for portable medical oxygen can vary greatly, usually between £30 and £100 ($50 – $150). It is interesting to note that many airlines charge not per canister, but per leg of your trip. So in a flight which involves two legs, you’re going to be charge twice as much a direct flight, despite the fact that you may be covering the same distance in the same length of time. 
Economically, therefore, it can work out a lot cheaper if you can organise a direct flight, though this may not always be possible.
If you need help with planning your trip use specialised medical oxygen companies who can help answer all your queries and make your journey stress-free and a safe landing.
There is also some planning whilst safely on the ground with back up services available for portable oxygen concentrators whilst travelling overseas so you can ensure to have a great holiday with medical oxygen.

COPD: The chronic misery of breathing

Almost always caused by tobacco smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease kills so many people per year. Treatments can’t reverse the symptoms but can halt deterioration.
travelling with medical oxygen
Some patients say they live with a constant feeling that they are breathing underwater, as if they were always drowning; others describe their breathlessness (even at rest), frequent coughing and never being able to exhale all the stale air in their lungs. 
It is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which used to be known as emphysema and chronic bronchitis, but these are only the symptoms and description of changes in the lungs. Emphysema was identified as early as the late 17th century.
In the majority of cases, you yourself have to smoke to get COPD; much less often, victims are non-smokers exposed passively to another’s smoke. 
Tobacco is almost the sole cause of COPD in the developed world; a much less common cause is intense and prolonged occupational exposure to workplace dusts, chemicals and fumes; in the Third World, the chronic disease can also result from indoor air pollution in the form of poorly ventilated cooking fires, often fueled by coal or biomass fuels such as wood and animal dung (making women the more common victims). 
Of those who smoke, about a fifth will get COPD, but among those who have puffed away for decades, about half will develop it, and the disease will kill many of them. In many developed countries such as the US and the UK, between 80 percent to 95% of COPD patients are either current smokers or previously smoked. There is no cure, but kicking the dirty habit can slow the progression and maybe even improve the situation a bit but can’t cure it; there are medications that can also ease the symptoms, thus early detection is important.
Respiratory rehabilitation and surgery to remove non-functioning lung tissue can also help. Lung transplants can eliminate the problem, but only a few donor organs are available.
Most of the sufferers are over the age of 55, and a majority are male, but due to their smoking habits, women are quickly catching up. By 2020, it is expected that COPD will be the third most common cause of death in the world and the fifth in engendering disability. This trend is ironic, as the prevalence of heart disease, which is also related to smoking, is decreasing. It takes years of exposure to tobacco to produced COPD.
The airways and air sacs are elastic, so when you inhale, each air sac fills up with air like a little balloon.
When you exhale, these sacs deflate and the air exits. But in COPD, less air flows out because the airways and air sacs lose their elastic quality; the walls between many of the air sacs are destroyed; the airway walls become thick and inflamed; and the airways are clogged with mucus.
ALL COPD patients have both chronic bronchitis and emphysema; some have more of one than the other. The first involves a persistent cough, significant amounts of mucus, fatigue, shortness of breath, chest discomfort.
Many patients require oxygen therapy at least 16 hours – and sometimes 24 hours – a day. Most patients have oxygen concentrators (machines that extract oxygen from air) at home. 
This does not cure but can help COPD sufferers every day when it comes to breathing to help make it less of a misery.