Going on holiday to Norway soon?

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norway
DON’T LET THE USE OF OXYGEN CONFINE YOU!
Customers travel on land, air and sea using Portable Oxygen Concentrators .
The following International airlines approve the Inogen One, SeQual Eclipse and the Respironics EverGo: Air France, Air Canada, El Al Airlines, Alitalia, SAS Airlines, Lufthansa, Qantas, All Nipon Airways, ATA Airlines, Cathey Pacific, Icelandair, Norwegian, LTU International, Singapore Airlines, Swiss International, and Virgin Atlantic.
Many satisfied customers have used OxygenWorldwide for travelling to destinations such as Norway for their portable oxygen needs.
We have the equipment, we have the experience:

  • International or Domestic Travel
  • Back up service
  • Air Travel
  • Train Travel
  • 24 hour service

OxygenWorldwide has been a leader in servicing the needs of medical oxygen travelers. We are experienced in serving your medical, home and airline oxygen needs while you are on the go!

What is fit to fly?

travel with oxygen
flying with medical oxygen

Most travellers with existing medical conditions are able to fly without difficulty. However, occasionally certain precautions need to be taken.
A fitness to fly form is required to be completed when:

  • Fitness to travel is in doubt as a result of recent illness, hospitalisation, injury or surgery
  • If you have an existing unstable medical condition
  • You wish to use medical equipment or therapeutic oxygen on-board

Most medical cases are straightforward, but some require individual assessment. In certain cases, we may ask that you and your doctor complete a “Fitness to Fly’ Form.

Carriage of a POC:

Passengers carrying a POC should obtain a Medical Equipment Approval & Baggage Waiver letter.   This approval & waiver letter must be presented at the Bag Drop desk or at the boarding gate if travelling with no checked baggage.

Use of POC during Flight:

If you wish to use a POC during flight, for the use onboard you will be required to complete a ‘Fit to Fly’ form which will be sent to the passenger once the requirement has been notified.   This completed “Fit to Fly’ form must be returned between 14 up to 2 days prior to travel for validation. The validated “Fit to Fly form must be carried by the passenger on all flights and produced to our cabin crew on boarding the aircraft.

If the POC is to be used onboard it is the passenger’s responsibility to ensure that they have a sufficient number of fully charged batteries for the duration of the flight and any possible delays, as POC or batteries cannot be charged on board.

Individual airline carriers have their own regulations please check before booking departure for full details.

For further info and back up service please contact our team at [email protected] or www.oxygenworldwide.com

For an example:

Please see below list of models approved for carriage on Ryanair flights:

AirSep FreeStyle (PDF)
AirSep LifeStyle (PDF)
AirSep Focus (PDF)
AirSep Freestyle 5 (PDF)
Delphi RS-00400 / Oxus RS-00400 (PDF)
DeVilbiss Healthcare iGo (PDF)
Inogen One (PDF)
Inogen One G2 (PDF)
lnogen One G3 (PDF)
lnova Labs LifeChoice Activox (PDF)
International Biophysics LifeChoice / lnova Labs LifeChoice (PDF)
Invacare XPO2 (PDF)
Invacare Solo 2 (PDF)
Oxylife Independence Oxygen Concentrator (PDF)
Precision Medical EasyPulse (PDF)
Respironics EverGo (PDF)
Respironics SimplyGo (PDF)
Sequal Eclipse (PDF)
SeQual SAROS (PDF)

 

Traveling with oxygen has become much easier with the development of portable oxygen concentrators

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Traveling with oxygen has become much easier with the development of portable oxygen concentrators (POCs). These devices run on a battery pack, can be recharged, plugged into the wall or a cigarette lighter in a car, and can be taken on airplanes.
Commercial airlines must provide a cabin pressure altitude of no more than 8,000 feet of altitude. Your pulmonologist can determine if air travel is safe for you. Your pulmonologist may order an altitude simulation test to help determine your ability to fly safely at this cabin pressure.
If you are going to need oxygen in flight, you must make arrangements with the airline well ahead of time. You can use either the on-board oxygen supply.
The airline will require a physician’s statement. The airlines generally have their own form for the doctor to complete.
Some tips for air travel with POCs:

  • Start making arrangements with the airline well ahead of time to find out which POC is allowed. Many airlines list accepted manufacturers and brands on their websites.
  • Allow plenty of extra time for check-in.
  • Carry several extra battery packs. FAA regulations require enough battery time to cover 150 percent of the flight time.
  • POCs and battery packs can be rented for travel, along with your POC.
  • Carry an extra three-way plug for recharging your POC in the airport. People often need to recharge their electronic equipment in the airport during layovers, and this will help assure that you will be able to recharge yours.
  • POCs are exempt from the carry-on count.
  • Carry a prescription for oxygen, signed by your doctor.

For more information about POCs and air travel, go to www.oxygenworldwide.com

Preparation is the key and will make your travels more enjoyable

Oxygen-Users-Mall-Walkers
For those with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema or chronic bronchitis, supplemental medical oxygen is a necessity. If you have ever tried to travel with supplemental oxygen, you know how difficult this can be. Being prepared, and knowing how to travel safely with oxygen and where to obtain oxygen at your final destination is vital.
Always check with your doctor and your oxygen company before traveling.
Safety is a very important issue when traveling by car, as an oxygen tank can become a dangerous projectile in an accident. It is crucial to secure the unit. Your oxygen company can provide you with information about safe ways to store and protect your particular oxygen unit in a vehicle.
Portable oxygen concentrators — which form oxygen by extracting and separating it from the surrounding air, and deliver it through a nasal cannula — may be stored in any position, but they should be padded to protect them from impact.
Small cylinder tanks holding compressed oxygen in gas form can also be stowed in any position, but the valve on top and the liter flow knob must be protected from collision through use of a seatbelt, webbing or other such device.
All unit types should be protected from heat, so they should not be stored in a car’s trunk, where extreme heat build-up can occur. In case of a fire, additional oxygen causes a fire to burn more rapidly, so always keep a car window open at least a crack to prevent the accumulation of more than the normal amount of oxygen. When refilling oxygen tanks at an outdoor facility, always remove the tanks from your car and place them in a well-ventilated area.
Travel by airplane also takes a good amount of research and preparation. No airline will allow you to bring aboard your own oxygen cylinder, but many airlines have medical oxygen cylinders available for a fee for use on their planes, such as Alaska Airlines, British Airways, Continental, Delta and Japan Airlines. The oxygen containers used on airplanes vary from airline to airline.
You must make arrangements to provide your own oxygen to and from the airplane. It is helpful to have someone take you to the airport and allow him or her to take your tank home.
Many airlines, such as Alaska Airlines, Delta, Frontier and Southwest, now allow travelers to bring aboard their own portable oxygen concentrators, but the airlines permit only the brands Inogen One or AirSep LifeStyle.
You must have enough fully charged batteries to last the entire flight and to allow for possible delays, as electricity will not be provided on the airplane. The way in which extra batteries must be stored varies from airline to airline. Contact your airline to obtain their regulations for battery storage.
You will also need to contact your airline to learn their requirements for advance notification of your need for medical oxygen. Many airlines will need a letter from your physician in advance of the flight, so they can contact him or her to verify liter flow. The letter should have a date of no more than one year prior to the flight (some airlines require a letter dated no more than 10 days prior to the flight), stating the amount of oxygen needed and the flow rate, adjusted to cabin pressure.
It is important to make advance arrangements for the delivery of oxygen to the airport of your destination. Almost all airlines require a 48-hour advance notice for domestic flights, and airlines can require up to 72 hours advance notice for international travel.
Many cruise lines allow you to bring your own oxygen, and they allow all types. Some will accept deliveries from medical-supply companies, while others only allow certain companies to deliver. You will need to contact the customer service department of the cruise line for the regulations on each ship.
When traveling by train, contact the customer service department to obtain regulations about traveling with medical oxygen.
In Europe, the rules and regulations for oxygen use on Eurail vary from country to country. There is no one place to find the information for a trip that takes you from country to country. Your best bet is to contact the customer service department of the railroad in each country you will be traveling through. You can find this information on the Eurail Website.
Being well prepared will make your travels much more enjoyable.
Happy travels!

Wiki Know-how for Oxygen and travel

Inogen-One-G3-dining
Oxygen was known to be the only element that supports respiration as early as 1800 and was first used in the medical field in 1810. However, it took about 150 years for the gas to be used throughout medicine. In the early to mid 20th century oxygen therapy became rational and scientific, and today modern medicine could not be practiced without the support that oxygen supplies.
Medical oxygen is used to:

  • provide a basis for virtually all modern anaesthetic techniques
  • restore tissue oxygen tension by improving oxygen availability in a wide range of conditions such as COPD, cyanosis, shock, severe hemorrhage, carbon monoxide poisoning, major trauma, cardiac/respiratory arrest
  • aid resuscitation
  • provide life support for artificially ventilated patients
  • reduce incidence of surgical wound infection
  • aid cardiovascular stability

Read our useful Wiki guide for all the information and explanations to do with travelling with medical oxygen with OxygenWorldwide.

Use Medical Oxygen? Warm those muscles

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We all know that exercising is important for a healthy lifestyle, so get out there and get moving! But before you get too far, remember to warm up your muscles by stretching. Flexibility exercises can help loosen up your body, helping you to feel better and more comfortable on a daily basis. You should stretch before all physical activity, even walking. So follow these simple steps to a more flexible body.
 If you feel pain, stop immediately and consult your physician or therapist. Never bounce while stretching; make steady movements that help your muscles stretch naturally.
Leg stretch: Sit in a chair with your legs bent in front of you. Straighten your right leg as much as possible without locking your knee. Lengthen your spine then lean forward reaching your hands toward your feet. Hold the stretch for 20 to 30 seconds, then rest and repeat with a flexed foot. Repeat the routine on your left side.
Chest Stretch: Begin by standing with your arms at your side and feet shoulder-width apart. Extend both arms behind your back and clasp your hands together, if possible. Stop when you feel a good stretch or sense discomfort. Hold this position for 20 to 30 seconds, then rest and repeat.
Quadriceps Stretch: Stand next to a sturdy chair or a counter with your feet about shoulder-width apart. Use the left hand to hold onto the chair or counter for balance. Slowly, bend your right knee back grabbing your right ankle with your right hand until your thigh is straight up and down. Do not lean forward or backward, but stand up straight. (If you can’t grasp your ankle in your hand, just keep your leg as close to perpendicular as possible and hold the bend, or place your foot on the seat of a chair.) Hold the stretch for 30 seconds then repeat on the left side.
Don’t worry if you can’t touch your toes or stretch as far as others, just do your best and improve over time.

Are you using a LifeChoice Portable Oxygen Concentrator?

Use OxygenWorldwide for travellling with lifechoice poc
We can provide a back up service when travelling with a Lifechoice portable oxygen concentrator.

If you are a proud owner of a LifeChoice POC then you will already know how The LifeChoice is now helping patients all over the world: USA, Europe, Latin America, Middle East and Asia.
The LifeChoice is the smallest POC (less than 2.2 kg) with 5+ hours of battery life, Auto Breath detection for Active and Sleep Mode, and the most powerful POC in its class at 750 ml output utilizing the state of the art Pulse Wave delivery system.   The Pulse Wave delivery is a technology advancement over standard demand bolus pulse systems.  You can feel the difference between the Pulse Wave and other demand systems. The LifeChoice is FDA listed (USA medical device), ISO 13485, FAA (airline use) and CE mark approved.
For mobile patients who are still active, walking, traveling, living their lives to the fullest and require 3 LPM or less, the truly portable LifeChoice is superior to the heavy carted/trolley transportable systems that the patient must drag behind them.   These heavy carted/trolley systems are not truly portable since they require a cart/trolley with wheels.  The LifeChoice also helps with certain patients where compressed or liquid oxygen gas is just not the right therapy especially if the patient is very mobile or travels.  Also, with the LifeChoice, there is no fear of your cylinder running out of oxygen.
With the LifeChoice and its unique Pulse Wave delivery system (a blend of pulse/continuous delivery), patients Stay Active and Sleep Well.
With OxygenWorldwide you can enquire online or speak to one of our expert multilingual members of staff to help organise your back up service to keep you and your LifeChoice portable oxygen concentrator safe and in working order.
Our registration for S.O.S back up service is completely FREE and for your peace of mind. Our team can work out and inform you if we can provide the service you might require in the place and country where you will be going. Although we generally will be able to help you without a pre-registration we can act faster if we have already your details in our database.
OxygenWorldwide can, if needed, also arrange oxygen at your destination before your arrival.
For further details on our back up service also known as simple oxygen solutions go to our website www.oxygenworldwide.com and simply complete the registration form.
We look forward to helping you travel with your portable oxygen concentrator with peace of mind.

Your health, your way – traveling with oxygen

Traveling with oxygen may seem intimidating. With a little planning, however, it can be easily -– and safely — done.
Oxygen Worldwide - experts in travelling with medical oxygenTraveling with medical oxygen
Before you begin to plan any kind of travel with oxygen, you’ll first need to get clearance from for travel. You’ll want to have his support and expertise to help with your travel plans.
After you’ve obtained a doctor’s clearance for travel, you’ll need to know the regulations and restrictions of traveling with oxygen. Whether you’re traveling by car, bus, or plane there will be some rules to follow and practical things you can do to make traveling with oxygen as easy as possible.
Destination decided, Dates of travel decided and you are ready to speak with the team at Oxygen Worldwide regarding your medical oxygen supply. The expert team can make all the arrangements of your oxygen supply to be at your destination for when you land and begin your adventure. A quote can be obtained easily and smoothly – plus the team at Oxygen Worldwide have years of expertise in traveling abroad with medical oxygen and can answer any questions or queries you may have.
Oxygen Worldwide also offer  a FREE back up on your oxygen supply when you register. This will safe guard you with any emergencies and make your travels completely stress free – making your travels easier.
Speak to a member of our tram regarding your oxygen requirements at oxygenworldwide.com or email [email protected]

Frequently Asked Q's #2

Oxygen worldwid e- experts when traveling with medical oxygen
What do I need to do in advance to travelling?
If you like to travel but have a medical condition that requires you use an oxygen tank, it’s important that your manage the transporting of your tank appropriately so as to avoid obstacles to your plans. Here are some good rules and regulations to become familiar with prior to traveling with oxygen. As a travel oxygen user it is entirely your responsibility to make yourself aware of your airlines requirements regarding use of portable oxygen concentrators on-board the aircraft. Traveling with oxygen does not have to be a hassle.
Please, do not wait until the last minute to notify the airline you will be traveling with oxygen. All the airlines require some advanced notice. All have their own specific requirements that must be met. Some even require a review of your prescription prior to travel. But with proper planning, traveling with oxygen need not be a daunting experience.
There are different rules for trains, planes and other modes of travel, so review with your specific carrier before bring your oxygen tank on-board. Most common carriers require advance notice, so do not appear at the counter to check- in unless you have contacted them earlier about your tank.  Some airlines require only 48 hours advance notice while others require seven days. The best rule of thumb is make arrangements as far in advance as possible. All airlines charge for oxygen, but the charges vary. Some charge per canister, but most charge per for each leg of the flight.
The 5 steps to successful travel
#1 Contact your doctor/GP to make sure it is safe for you to be traveling with your medical condition, and if the oxygen tank that you use is also safe for travel. You will not be able to bring your own oxygen on-board with you, so you will have to use oxygen provided by the airlines for the duration of the flight.
#2 Call the airline that you plan to travel in advance of your flight. Ask to speak with special services or the medical department of the carrier in order to make arrangements for to be able bring your tank on board.
#3 Make sure that you confirm that you meet the requirements of the carrier. Confirm with them that they can provide the flow of air you need and whether or not they will provide you with a nasal cannula or mask .
# 4 Confirm all of your arrangements by phone at least 48 hours before your flight boards and make sure to go over all of the rules and regulations that the airlines give you. Typically, the airlines will direct you to a website with rules for those traveling with medical oxygen or they will send you a pamphlet.
# 5 These same steps apply if you are traveling by train or cruise ship. Coordinate with your common carrier beforehand to avoid headaches. If cruising, make sure to contact the company PRIOR TO purchasing tickets, since many cruise lines will not allow oxygen tanks on board.
For all you medical oxygen needs please contact Oxygen Worldwide today and also register for your FREE back up service whilst abroad. Our team are open 24 hours, 7 days a week and also speak many languages.