Stressed? Our guide to take the stress out of travelling with oxygen

In support of #stressawarenessmonth here is our guide to help decrease the stress levels when organising your next trip or holiday abroad. Stress can de-balance your well-being and health causing extra medical problems that with a few simple tips you can try to avoid.


Relax.
Travel with oxygen.
No stress.

  1. Sleep well – not getting your 8 hours a night? A good nights sleep will mean you wont struggle throughout the day, your memory will improve and you will be ill less frequently. We would not want you to be ill prior to your planned holiday and also you will become much more relaxed and able to enjoy your travel plans more.
  2. Be organised – plan all your oxygen needs in advance and speak with one of the experienced team members at OyxgenWorldwide who will take all the stress out of organising your travel with oxygen for you.
  3. Choosing your destination – If you are thinking about planning your next holiday destination then as an individual who travels with oxygen you must select wisely. We have built up a whole network of partners and relationships so that we can supply to most areas of the world but here are most of the country destinations we can provide our service when travelling with oxygen.
  4. 24/7 care – OxygenWorldwide provide 24/7 contact telephone assistance to completely keep you at ease during your holiday.
  5. Remember to relax and enjoy your travels. For more tips on stress generally please follow #stressawarenessmonth for further information and some great advice.
Travel with oxygen

What does medical oxygen do?

So lets go back to what does medical oxygen do? Some of you will already know the exact functions of this very important and vital medical piece of equipment but for those who want to find out more please do read on…

Medical oxygen is used to provide a basis for anaesthetic techniques, restore tissue oxygen tension in a wide range of condtions suc as COPD, asthma, hemorrhage and carbon monoxide poisoning.

Medical oxygen has an expiry of 3 years so this is very important to be kept in line with and liquid oxygen tanks deliver about 6 litres per minute.

Many people use medical oxygen to improve their condition by breathing in air that contains more oxygen from a cylinder. Breathing air with oxygen increases oxygen in your blood. This makes even the most simplest of activities such as walking much easier.

As long as you plan in advance with OxygenWorldwide you can still go on holiday! Oxygen can be delivered to your destination with enough supply to last your holiday duration. Please do find out if our team can help organise your next trip as we deliver to many countries across the world.

Fit to fly?

 
Billions of us travel by air each year however we are all individuals with varying needs, including a range of medical conditions and all airlines have different policies regarding this. For example some airlines will require a medical certificate to prove that you fit to fly.
plane2
The airline needs to ensure that air travel will not worsen or agitate a pre-existing condition and also that the patient’s ailment will not affect the comfort or safety of other passengers on the flight. Regardless of a doctor’s medical certificate the final decision remains with the airline and the captain of the flight and they may still refuse carriage.
A main considering factor involved in this decision making process is the affect of altitude, humidity and oxygen saturation levels during flight. Modern aircraft have a cabin altitude pressure equivalent of between 5,000 and 8,000 feet above sea level. (source: cyprusairways.com) This means that your blood will not be as saturated with oxygen and can affect breathing, cardiac activity, circulation and brain activity. Sometimes during flight, although not normally for long periods of time, a person’s oxygen saturation level can fall to 90%. A healthy individual can tolerate this temporary change with no problems however a patient with cardiac, anaemia or respiratory problems may find themselves in serious difficulties.
Aircraft cabins have low humidity levels that dry out the air; this can cause dryness of the skin or other mucous membranes within the body such as the throat and lungs and affect respiration.
Reduced cabin pressure can also cause gas volume expansion. Any gas that may have inadvertently been introduced to the body during surgery could then expand and cause pain or even perforation through the membrane.
A main deciding factor in whether or not a person may be considered ‘fit to fly’ is their oxygen saturation level. If a person’s saturation level is equal to, or more than 95%, they do not need oxygen for flying. If an asthma sufferer has a stable status then they should be able to fly as long as they keep their medication to hand. Anyone with an active exacerbation of respiratory disease should wait until their condition has improved before considering to fly. Consultation with a doctor or respiratory specialist will aid in ascertaining whether it is wise to fly or whether additional aids or medication would be wise to use during the flight. This may also help to persuade the airline that you are fit to fly.
As passengers sometimes cannot take their own oxygen equipment on board due to regulatory requirements although this is changing and more and more POC’s (portable oxygen concentrators) are allowed on board of the aircraft.

If a passenger has used oxygen provided by the airline company he or she will have to pre-arrange oxygen at the end of the flight. OxygenWorldwide does provide an Airport Service where they have somone waiting at the door of the aircraft to hand over a portable oxygen device so one can travel onwards to their hotel or other holiday destination.
Please check with OxygenWoldwide for availability on your destination

Your travel Checklist

A checklist for those traveling with portable oxygen concentrators

travel checklist for medical oxygen

 
□ Ask your doctor before traveling
Check with your doctor for travel clearance, especially if you’ve been hospitalized recently.
□ Complete the paperwork
You may need a letter from your doctor that verifies all of your medications, including oxygen.
□ Take a copy of your oxygen prescription
You will need to show your prescription to travel personnel, so be sure to carry it with you.
□ Take contact info for your Doctor: ________________________________________________
Phone: _____________________________
Respiratory Therapist: ____________________________________
Phone: _____________________________
Oxygen Supplier: ________________________________________
Phone: _____________________________
Home Healthcare Representative: ___________________________
Phone: _____________________________
□ Take enough medication to last the entire trip
Remember to pack all medication and supplies in your carry-on bag and keep a list of medications with you at all times.
□ Wear emergency medical identification
□ Contact your home healthcare company
Tell them where you are going so they can assist in arranging for oxygen when you reach your destination.
□ Know how to use your portable oxygen concentrator
Try operating on all types of power: AC, DC, battery. Test how long your batteries last at your dosage or liter flow level.
□ Contact your travel carrier
Call your airline, cruise ship or bus company before departure to check for any special requirements.
 

Few top tips for travelling with medical oxygen

Top tips for traveling with medical oxygen
How can I make travelling easier?

  • Make all travel plans in advance
  • Prepare for typical problems
  • Plan rest stops, snack breaks, stretches and short walks
  • Plan to travel at cooler times of the day or year, so less air conditioning is needed
  • Follow your home routine as much as possible
  • When making travel reservations (e.g. bus, airline, tours), be sure to notify the staff of your oxygen use, so they can accommodate your needs

For further information, quotes and advice when travelling abroad with medical oxygen contact our team at OxygenWorldwide on info@oxygenworldwide.com