Why do i need oxygen more in the summer?

inhaler
Do your asthma symptoms change with the seasons?
While the winter months can mean pesky infections and extreme cold temperatures (both potentially troublesome for asthma), summer can bring its own set of ‘triggers’ for the 5.4 million people living with the condition in the UK.
Pollen is thought to be a ‘hidden trigger’ for 80% of people with asthma, according to LloydsPharmacy, who report that last year, 91% of their asthma control tests (the high-street pharmacy offers an Asthma Treatment and Advice service) took place from March-May, peak hay-fever season. Furthermore, 46% of the tests carried out during that period found people were not controlling their asthma well.
If you have asthma and are prone to hay fever, or find your symptoms flare-up in spring and summer, it might be worth checking out some of the apps that monitor and alert you to pollen forecasts. And if you’re struggling to keep symptoms under control, speak to your nurse or GP.
Depending where you travel to, a holiday could mean a new set of triggers, especially if you’re in a new environment and climate that’s different to what you’re used to. Other people may find that changes in routine, location, temperature, or even air travel, can make their asthma symptoms worse
“The best thing people can do to prevent symptoms and attacks when they’re on holiday is to keep on top of their medicine routine.
Asthma UK has more advice about travelling with asthma on their website it’s always a good idea to carry your inhalers (and all your spare inhalers) in your hand luggage, in case your inhaler runs out or if your checked-in baggage goes missing.
Summer is all about letting your hair down and enjoying life – and there’s no reason your asthma should stop you. But, from smoky barbecues to greater exposure to air pollution if you’re pounding the pavements on days out, it’s a good idea to be aware of any potential summertime asthma triggers.
ref: http://www.nwemail.co.uk

Leave a Reply